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Whether you can or can't actually vote IRL, In, or Out
In 62%  62%  [ 218 ]
Out 38%  38%  [ 136 ]
Total votes : 354
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:16 am 
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spookly wrote:
La soule wrote:
spookly wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
I was wondering is calling the election a good thing having allready activated article 50. This basically pauses everything on the british side for 2 to 3 months which makes a no-deal brexit the most likely scenario


It won't pause anything in reality. And if there is no deal, it really isn't that catastrophic. It'll not be good for the EU on any level.



I will be grand for the UK, of course :thumbup:

Delusional really. and that's being nice about it.


I think it would certainly involve challenges in implementation. The changes would be initially painful, but we already do most of our trade under WTO rules, so this isn't some unprecedented thing that the UK has no experience of handling, but the transition and volume may initially be challenging.

Under WTO rules we'll levy more fees on goods coming from the EU than the EU countries will levy on UK exports going to them, And we save on the annual membership fee. And the EUs chance of getting a big divorce payment is nil if no deal is likely.

I think the really telling thing is that nobody had ever done any analysis of whether the EU is good for the UK, or any other European country for that matter. No statistics, unbiased reports. Civitas made a good stab at it, and found that the EU had a positive benefit of 0 to 0.2% on trade but that is diminishing. The positive benefit was also less than the cost of contributing.

So, instead of stating really dumb things. Why don't you try telling us all why you think what you think? Try explaining why the EU is good for the UK, what problems we will face, and maybe read the Civitas report and tell us why they are wrong.

Most of the EU based contributors to this thread seem to be a bit bitter that the UK is leaving. We aren't moving out of Europe, just saying we don't want to be in the EU club anymore. No need to get all offended and get your panties in a twist.
I guess it must be hard to see one of the biggest financial contributors to the EU project walking out the door, and realising they'll be after you to pay for the shortfall if you happen to be in a net contributing country :-)


Get that head out of your arse.

I think it is a pity the UK are leaving indeed. But considering all things, now looking forward to see you guys leaving so that we can get on with things. I hope you get a decent deal in terms of what type of access you will get to the market. See, not everybody is a as bitter as haters Brexiters

There is nothing to discuss with someone who things that Brexit will be bad for the EU but not the UK. As I said, delusional, for not wanting to use another word.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:21 am 
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Lie pen wins at the weekend and all this become moot.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:24 am 
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bimboman wrote:
Lie pen wins at the weekend and all this become moot.


Wont matter if she only wins this weekend.

Although it would be bloody horrible.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:27 am 
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La soule wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Lie pen wins at the weekend and all this become moot.


Wont matter if she only wins this weekend.

Although it would be bloody horrible.



What about that commie coming in second though, how's them onions ?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:30 am 
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bimboman wrote:
La soule wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Lie pen wins at the weekend and all this become moot.


Wont matter if she only wins this weekend.

Although it would be bloody horrible.



What about that commie coming in second though, how's them onions ?



It would be extremely bad to have both extremes in the second round. Not funny. It is unlikely he will get there though.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:39 am 
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If the WTO rules make our goods more expensive than competitors, Europe will stop buying them though. How much would we pay on WTO fees for our European goods (until we can replace some from elsewhere), and how does that reflect on our membership fees?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:41 am 
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Raggs wrote:
If the WTO rules make our goods more expensive than competitors, Europe will stop buying them though. How much would we pay on WTO fees for our European goods (until we can replace some from elsewhere), and how does that reflect on our membership fees?



Average tarif about 5.2% out, 5.8% in. They'll be winners and losers, more worrying is transfer business and the city.

Replacement of agriculture goods would be easy though.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:58 am 
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spookly wrote:
La soule wrote:
spookly wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
I was wondering is calling the election a good thing having allready activated article 50. This basically pauses everything on the british side for 2 to 3 months which makes a no-deal brexit the most likely scenario


It won't pause anything in reality. And if there is no deal, it really isn't that catastrophic. It'll not be good for the EU on any level.



I will be grand for the UK, of course :thumbup:

Delusional really. and that's being nice about it.


I think it would certainly involve challenges in implementation. The changes would be initially painful, but we already do most of our trade under WTO rules, so this isn't some unprecedented thing that the UK has no experience of handling, but the transition and volume may initially be challenging.

Under WTO rules we'll levy more fees on goods coming from the EU than the EU countries will levy on UK exports going to them, And we save on the annual membership fee. And the EUs chance of getting a big divorce payment is nil if no deal is likely.

I think the really telling thing is that nobody had ever done any analysis of whether the EU is good for the UK, or any other European country for that matter. No statistics, unbiased reports. Civitas made a good stab at it, and found that the EU had a positive benefit of 0 to 0.2% on trade but that is diminishing. The positive benefit was also less than the cost of contributing.

So, instead of stating really dumb things. Why don't you try telling us all why you think what you think? Try explaining why the EU is good for the UK, what problems we will face, and maybe read the Civitas report and tell us why they are wrong.

Most of the EU based contributors to this thread seem to be a bit bitter that the UK is leaving. We aren't moving out of Europe, just saying we don't want to be in the EU club anymore. No need to get all offended and get your panties in a twist.
I guess it must be hard to see one of the biggest financial contributors to the EU project walking out the door, and realising they'll be after you to pay for the shortfall if you happen to be in a net contributing country :-)

Non tariff barriers are a big problem than tariffs.The UK will at a minimum need some agreemwnt with EU on the like the US and China. This narrows the options down to deal or deal.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:01 am 
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paddyor wrote:
Non tariff barriers are a big problem than tariffs.The UK will at a minimum need some agreemwnt with EU on the like the US and China. This narrows the options down to deal or deal.


The elephant in the room with NTBs is that, without specific agreements, the UK will not only have to comply with all the EU regs, but show that they comply, ie. the presumption will be that they don't.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:08 am 
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Mother had better butter up Angela and invite her to lots of cream teas and prayers at the vicarage. That Schulz looks a nasty fellow.

"If Schulz triumphs over Merkel in September’s federal elections, the chances of Britain crashing out of the EU without a deal would rise. Schulz has long had an antagonistic relationship with Britain, and, lacking Merkel’s personal authority with EU leaders, would be ill-equipped to forge a compromise.

Whatever the result of the forthcoming British and German elections, London should not expect much help from Berlin."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... ela-merkel


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:13 am 
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Rugby2023 wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
Santa wrote:
I have a lot of respect for Gina Miller. She made a good point, fought in the right way and advanced the debate. Sure she was looking for a way to overturn the referendum result but so what. She doesn't deserve all the shite she's got.


Absolutely. No one deserves to get threats and get called vile things. But I refuse to believe her intention was to get Brexit bill in to the parliament to demonstrate parliament sovereignty when she can't accept the result commons overwhelmingly supported the ball.

But anyway you are right that she hasn't done anything wrong.

Yeah, her argument was it's "just about the legal process" and that the Brexiteers should thank her, but then when the Commons vote didn't go her way she started claiming MPs had no backbone etc. I have no issue with her either, imo she is a proud Briton who genuinely wants the best for the UK but she should accept results when they come in.



Much agreed with these points. It's interesting she is now trying to set-up organisations to tactical vote MPs in or out in this election. Though weirdly history will probably show she helped legitimise Brexit by making it going through parliament which i don't think she wanted.

Interesting that she is continuing her crusade against brexit, clearly she lied about it just being about Parliament and the people who claimed her actions were just that were fooled.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:24 am 
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jorwar wrote:
Mother had better butter up Angela and invite her to lots of cream teas and prayers at the vicarage. That Schulz looks a nasty fellow.

"If Schulz triumphs over Merkel in September’s federal elections, the chances of Britain crashing out of the EU without a deal would rise. Schulz has long had an antagonistic relationship with Britain, and, lacking Merkel’s personal authority with EU leaders, would be ill-equipped to forge a compromise.

Whatever the result of the forthcoming British and German elections, London should not expect much help from Berlin."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... ela-merkel


Nice of you to post an article form a guy whose such an expert he predicted the Tories would give-up on the EU issue last parliament and is neutral enough he runs a pro-EU think tank.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:26 am 
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La soule wrote:

Get that head out of your arse.

I think it is a pity the UK are leaving indeed. But considering all things, now looking forward to see you guys leaving so that we can get on with things. I hope you get a decent deal in terms of what type of access you will get to the market. See, not everybody is a as bitter as haters Brexiters

There is nothing to discuss with someone who things that Brexit will be bad for the EU but not the UK. As I said, delusional, for not wanting to use another word.



This is a fair sentiment and a nice change of direction, as it does seem at odds with your prior posting were to kept indicating the UK was gonna get screwed.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:30 am 
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Rocketz wrote:
Theresa May hands UK another opportunity to highlight how stupid it is

http://newsthump.com/2017/04/18/theresa ... pid-it-is/

Theresa May has announced plans for a snap general election that will provide the UK with yet another opportunity to highlight how stupid it is.

In an announcement outside 10 Downing Street, the Prime Minister said, “If there was ever any doubt that the UK electorate is predominantly made up of clueless idiots then this election will put those doubts to rest.”

With recent polls suggesting that voters are keen to sign up to more of being repeatedly kicked in the genitals, the Conservatives will be confident of a landslide victory.

Colossal bellend Simon Williams revealed that he was looking forward to exercising his right to be a complete f**k.

“If people don’t vote then they can’t complain about the monumentally moronic decision that they made,” he said.

“That’s why we have a democracy.”


You do realise your precious EU has welcomed the election and have leaked opinion they think it's great for the negotiations as May obviously wants a close relationship with the EU but with controls on borders and our laws and the continued tariff free trade. I believe that is broadly a relationship most Brits (and most EU citizens for their countries) want even if they are Remainers.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:49 am 
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camroc1 wrote:
paddyor wrote:
Non tariff barriers are a big problem than tariffs.The UK will at a minimum need some agreemwnt with EU on the like the US and China. This narrows the options down to deal or deal.


The elephant in the room with NTBs is that, without specific agreements, the UK will not only have to comply with all the EU regs, but show that they comply, ie. the presumption will be that they don't.


Yup, anyone who works in a regulated industry will be familiar with how much perceptions matter. Its far easier to deal with people who don't automatically assume you are non-compliant. In pharma the perception is all Indian companies are gangsters, they are audited accordingly. A lot of Chinese companies (even sub divisions of major American multinationals) are forced to do final release testing for their products in European test labs as we won't accept their results etc.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:08 am 
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jorwar wrote:
Mother had better butter up Angela and invite her to lots of cream teas and prayers at the vicarage. That Schulz looks a nasty fellow.

"If Schulz triumphs over Merkel in September’s federal elections, the chances of Britain crashing out of the EU without a deal would rise. Schulz has long had an antagonistic relationship with Britain, and, lacking Merkel’s personal authority with EU leaders, would be ill-equipped to forge a compromise.

Whatever the result of the forthcoming British and German elections, London should not expect much help from Berlin."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... ela-merkel



On the surface, Merkel, who is still the favorite by miles. Also when it comes down to it, German business will put pressure on their leaders to trade with the UK one of their biggest markets (biggest in some cases). We know Merkel will listen but I can only assume Schulz would have to want to damage his own economy over Brexit which is surely political suicide and will play badly in an election. His party is already losing ground again after peaking a month ago. Though the possibility is that Germany version of UKIP are polling third. Some predict it will be Merkel under a SNP, Green Party and left party.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:28 am 
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La soule wrote:
spookly wrote:
La soule wrote:
spookly wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
I was wondering is calling the election a good thing having allready activated article 50. This basically pauses everything on the british side for 2 to 3 months which makes a no-deal brexit the most likely scenario


It won't pause anything in reality. And if there is no deal, it really isn't that catastrophic. It'll not be good for the EU on any level.



I will be grand for the UK, of course :thumbup:

Delusional really. and that's being nice about it.


I think it would certainly involve challenges in implementation. The changes would be initially painful, but we already do most of our trade under WTO rules, so this isn't some unprecedented thing that the UK has no experience of handling, but the transition and volume may initially be challenging.

Under WTO rules we'll levy more fees on goods coming from the EU than the EU countries will levy on UK exports going to them, And we save on the annual membership fee. And the EUs chance of getting a big divorce payment is nil if no deal is likely.

I think the really telling thing is that nobody had ever done any analysis of whether the EU is good for the UK, or any other European country for that matter. No statistics, unbiased reports. Civitas made a good stab at it, and found that the EU had a positive benefit of 0 to 0.2% on trade but that is diminishing. The positive benefit was also less than the cost of contributing.

So, instead of stating really dumb things. Why don't you try telling us all why you think what you think? Try explaining why the EU is good for the UK, what problems we will face, and maybe read the Civitas report and tell us why they are wrong.

Most of the EU based contributors to this thread seem to be a bit bitter that the UK is leaving. We aren't moving out of Europe, just saying we don't want to be in the EU club anymore. No need to get all offended and get your panties in a twist.
I guess it must be hard to see one of the biggest financial contributors to the EU project walking out the door, and realising they'll be after you to pay for the shortfall if you happen to be in a net contributing country :-)


Get that head out of your arse.

I think it is a pity the UK are leaving indeed. But considering all things, now looking forward to see you guys leaving so that we can get on with things. I hope you get a decent deal in terms of what type of access you will get to the market. See, not everybody is a as bitter as haters Brexiters

There is nothing to discuss with someone who things that Brexit will be bad for the EU but not the UK. As I said, delusional, for not wanting to use another word.


I don't think it will be without challenges for either the UK or the EU. But I also don't think it will be catastrophic for either. There are specific industries and exports in each direction which will suffer more.

Do I think that the EU provides much benefit to the UK. No, I really don't. Will there be an impact to the UK from unpicking this mess, yes probably. But any impact in either direction will depend on any agreements reached, which seem to be in the self interest of both the UK and EU.

I would not be at all surprised to see the UK having near enough free market access, as an EU outsider, but with some level of divorce payment and *much* smaller ongoing contributions to the EU.

As for "haters brexiters"... odd thing to say. I prefer to look at data and facts and work from there. Emotion does not come into it. So far as Europe goes, love it, love the people I've met and worked with throughout Europe. But I have no love for the EU, how it works, or where it is headed. For me, supporting Brexit is about my lack of enthusiasm for the EU and how it is run.

I had a conversation with some European colleagues over a few beers in Leuven, probably about 5 years ago. They couldn't understand why the UK wasn't more gung ho for the EU project. I told them that I like the concept of the EU, but not the execution. They all agreed that they didn't like how it was run either. The EU was never going to change.... maybe the Brits have done the rest of Europe a favour as finally the EU does seem to be twigging that just maybe they need to reform.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 12:04 pm 
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unfortunately, la soule found himself otherwise indisposed on t'other thread, so in the spirit of entente cordiale, and on his behalf, can I just say...'merde!'.




next week, mon brave.. :thumbup:

(no, I didn't report it and dunno who did)


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 12:16 pm 
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La soule wrote:
bimboman wrote:
La soule wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Lie pen wins at the weekend and all this become moot.


Wont matter if she only wins this weekend.

Although it would be bloody horrible.



What about that commie coming in second though, how's them onions ?



It would be extremely bad to have both extremes in the second round. Not funny. It is unlikely he will get there though.


The latest polls show the top four candidates all within 4-5 points of each other with around 30%+ of the French population still undecided.

A Le Pen/Melenchon run-off is still very much on the cards.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 12:22 pm 
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NickC wrote:
La soule wrote:
bimboman wrote:
La soule wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Lie pen wins at the weekend and all this become moot.


Wont matter if she only wins this weekend.

Although it would be bloody horrible.



What about that commie coming in second though, how's them onions ?



It would be extremely bad to have both extremes in the second round. Not funny. It is unlikely he will get there though.


The latest polls show the top four candidates all within 4-5 points of each other with around 30%+ of the French population still undecided.

A Le Pen/Melenchon run-off is still very much on the cards.

I wouldn't have thought that the "undecided" portion would vote for Le Pen, though.

I confess that I'm not too well versed in matters French Political, but I would imagine that she's quite a polarising entity and you're either for her (in which case you aren't undecided), or against her (in which case you are definitely are not undecided).


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 12:48 pm 
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I think the wave of support for both Melenchon and Fillon has probably crested which will leave Macron to win in the second round against Le Pen. I have no idea what that will mean for France other than business as usual.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:12 pm 
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Bloomberg have a good French Election blotter....

https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2017 ... ium=social


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:41 pm 
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Le Pen winning is crucial to the survival of Europe.

Sadly, I can't see it happening.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:41 pm 
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DAC2016 wrote:
Le Pen winning is crucial to the survival of Europe.

Sadly, I can't see it happening.

and this is why we laugh at this cretin


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:44 pm 
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Laurent wrote:
DAC2016 wrote:
Le Pen winning is crucial to the survival of Europe.

Sadly, I can't see it happening.

and this is why we laugh at this cretin


Yup, hard to believe one person can be simultaneously wrong on so many topics


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:50 pm 
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sewa wrote:
Laurent wrote:
DAC2016 wrote:
Le Pen winning is crucial to the survival of Europe.

Sadly, I can't see it happening.

and this is why we laugh at this cretin


Yup, hard to believe one person can be simultaneously wrong on so many topics


What have I been wrong on?

<silence>


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:54 pm 
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DAC2016 wrote:
Le Pen winning is crucial to the survival of Europe.

Sadly, I can't see it happening.


That is certainly the Neo Nazi position well articulated :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:54 pm 
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your racist porte drapeau wants to destroy the EU (while stealing money from EU tax payers)


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:57 pm 
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waguser wrote:
DAC2016 wrote:
Le Pen winning is crucial to the survival of Europe.

Sadly, I can't see it happening.


That is certainly the Neo Nazi position well articulated :thumbup:


Are you able to support that position using facts or did you just say that to try and associate me with being a Nazi?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 2:02 pm 
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People please note; when white middle class liberals/SJWs see something they don't like they develop an instant bout of nazi tourettes.

They do this because they are brainwashed little fecks.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:12 am 
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http://www.cityam.com/263289/british-re ... =dvTwitter
Quote:
Retail sales in the UK fell at the sharpest quarterly rate for seven years in March as price increases started to weigh on the British consumer.

Sales fell by 1.8 per cent during the month while store prices grew by 3.3 per cent, the fastest rate of growth since March 2012, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

The fall of 1.4 per cent in the first three months of 2017 was the first quarterly decline in sales since the end of 2013, and the biggest fall since the start of 2010.

Kate Davies, ONS senior statistician said: “This is the first time we’ve seen a quarterly decline since 2013, and it seems to be a consequence of price increases across a whole range of sectors."

The largest price rises came from petrol stations, which saw prices rise by 16.4 per cent year-on-year. Petrol prices have soared since oil cartel Opec (the Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries) agreed to cut production in November.

Meanwhile the fall in sterling since the EU referendum has raised inflation to a 2.3 per cent annual rate in the UK, as imports become more expensive. Despite recent rises the pound remains around 15 per cent less valuable than its pre-referendum peak against the US dollar.

Richard Lim, chief executive at Retail Economics said: “This latest data shows that the surge in inflation is putting retailers under intense pressure with the first quarterly decline in retail sales since 2013. Families are facing the fastest rise in living costs for over three years and they are reining in their spending rapidly.

The pound fell to lows of $1.2781 against the US dollar in morning trading.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:15 am 
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Rising fuel costs
And pound has been even lower in the past. A lot of economists also agree that Pound was overvalued and since it's lost some ground, it's given the economy a boost.

But lets blame Brexit for everything.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:18 am 
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TranceNRG wrote:
Rising fuel costs
And pound has been even lower in the past. A lot of economists also agree that Pound was overvalued and since it's lost some ground, it's given the economy a boost.

But lets blame Brexit for everything.


You're seriously suggesting that the fall in the pound was not related to Brexit? And that a big drop in retail sales is "giving the economy a boost"?

Wait, forgot who I was addressing, of course you are

:lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:20 am 
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Article by Peter Geoghegan on the snap election and what it could mean to the Celtic parts of the UK.

Quote:
Does Theresa May Actually Care About Keeping the Kingdom United?

As prime minister, Theresa May has been at pains — rhetorically, at least — to stress her commitment to keeping the United Kingdom together. In her inaugural public appearance on the steps of Downing Street last July, in the wake of the Brexit campaign that left the kingdom’s various nations bitterly divided, the newly minted premier declared that preserving the three-centuries-old union is “very important” to her. A few months later, at the Conservative Party conference, May doubled down on her commitment to unionism. “I will never allow divisive nationalists to undermine the precious union between the four nations of our United Kingdom,” she promised.

Stirring stuff. But for all the rousing rhetoric, May’s actions suggest a rather more ambivalent attitude to the United Kingdom and the threat of its demise. The latest signal that her priorities, in reality, lie elsewhere: this week’s decision to call a general election.

Viewed from London — or even Berlin or Washington — the British prime minister’s move makes cold, calculating sense. The Conservatives enjoy vertiginous poll leads over a divided Labour Party. May’s majority is slim. Now is the time — in the words of the Daily Mail — to “crush” those who oppose Brexit.

But viewed from Edinburgh or Belfast — both capitals of regions (Scotland and Northern Ireland, respectively) that voted to remain in Europe — the decision looks very different. The general election will take place at a time of almost unprecedented constitutional tumult on the fringes of an increasingly attenuated union.


http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/04/20/does-theresa-may-actually-care-about-keeping-the-kingdom-united/

It's not entirely applicable to this thread, but want to post it somewhere, it's a good read.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:28 am 
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for the threat of independence to mean something the region threatening to leave has to generally be richer than the union it's leaving and self-sufficient without the subsidisation of the union. Brexit and Catalonian independence make sense in that regard but Scottish independence really doesn't

that's why May doesn't really need to pander to the Celts in this election, because she knows the threat of independence isn't a credible one


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:32 am 
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openclashXX wrote:
for the threat of independence to mean something the region threatening to leave has to generally be richer than the union it's leaving and self-sufficient without the subsidisation of the union. Brexit and Catalonian independence make sense in that regard but Scottish independence really doesn't

that's why May doesn't really need to pander to the Celts in this election, because she knows the threat of independence isn't a credible one


Well the UK is definitely not richer than the EU, and the existence of an independent Ireland (or the USA, for that matter) rather belie your other point


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:35 am 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
Rising fuel costs
And pound has been even lower in the past. A lot of economists also agree that Pound was overvalued and since it's lost some ground, it's given the economy a boost.

But lets blame Brexit for everything.


You're seriously suggesting that the fall in the pound was not related to Brexit? And that a big drop in retail sales is "giving the economy a boost"?

Wait, forgot who I was addressing, of course you are

:lol:


No you twit, you are one of those pessimists who would post anything negative with glee and point it as a Brexit disaster when in reality there were also other factors than just Brexit.
As I said, the drop in pound also helped to boost exports and overall economy - plenty of economist agree with this. Pretty much all the economic data that has come out since Brexit has been positive. As for inflation, yes it's linked to the drop in pound but also rising fuel costs due to crude oil going up in price. Level of inflation is still acceptable. IIRC Germany's inflation is also at a similar level.


Last edited by TranceNRG on Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:38 am 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
openclashXX wrote:
for the threat of independence to mean something the region threatening to leave has to generally be richer than the union it's leaving and self-sufficient without the subsidisation of the union. Brexit and Catalonian independence make sense in that regard but Scottish independence really doesn't

that's why May doesn't really need to pander to the Celts in this election, because she knows the threat of independence isn't a credible one


Well the UK is definitely not richer than the EU, and the existence of an independent Ireland (or the USA, for that matter) rather belie your other point


How did you come to that conclusion?


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:38 am 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
openclashXX wrote:
for the threat of independence to mean something the region threatening to leave has to generally be richer than the union it's leaving and self-sufficient without the subsidisation of the union. Brexit and Catalonian independence make sense in that regard but Scottish independence really doesn't

that's why May doesn't really need to pander to the Celts in this election, because she knows the threat of independence isn't a credible one


Well the UK is definitely not richer than the EU, and the existence of an independent Ireland (or the USA, for that matter) rather belie your other point


perhaps I didn't word myself clearly - in per capita terms we are richer than the EU as a bloc ($42k vs $37k) and are net contributors in terms of our budgetary contributions. the same way that England is a net subsidiser of Wales, Scotland and NI


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:39 am 
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"Pessimist" he says. Nothing could be further from the truth- on the basis that a pessimist says things cannot possibly get any worse and an optimist says "oh yes it can", I am absolutely an optimist


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