planetf1.com

It is currently Wed Feb 19, 2020 3:57 pm

All times are UTC


Forum rules


Please read the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
DOLOMITE wrote:
Battle Far wrote:
There are sports where women can compete equally with men physically such as aerobatics, fixed wing glider (not hang gliders) racing, show jumping, etc. F1 isn't one of them, Noda is 100% correct, women have to compensate for their physiological disadvantages with MORE training to compete with men.



Saying it's harder to get there isn't the same thing as it can't be done.

That being the case you would then have to ask just how serious some of these women are, Calderon apparently gave up on F2 because she found it physically too hard I believe?

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:28 pm 
Online

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 16668
pokerman wrote:
DOLOMITE wrote:
Battle Far wrote:
There are sports where women can compete equally with men physically such as aerobatics, fixed wing glider (not hang gliders) racing, show jumping, etc. F1 isn't one of them, Noda is 100% correct, women have to compensate for their physiological disadvantages with MORE training to compete with men.



Saying it's harder to get there isn't the same thing as it can't be done.

That being the case you would then have to ask just how serious some of these women are, Calderon apparently gave up on F2 because she found it physically too hard I believe?


I think it's well known F2 is more physical than F1.

Also, I was under the impression that not much was expected of Calderon in F2? I don't think her performances were out of the realms of what you would expect given her career up to that point.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
Tia lifts more than most guys who have been lifting for years. Now there's noway you have to be that strong to drive an F1 car so a women should be OK. Even if they have to train a little harder to get there. F2 is much more physical than F1. It's been said by numerous people.

Well she's probably one of these 1 in a thousand women, we seem to be going down this route that any woman can be as strong as a man and therefore can compete on an equal footing to a man which clearly is not true.

We've seen in the past the likes of Danica Patrick struggle to drive an Indycar on street and road courses because the cars didn't have power steering, why wasn't it a simple matter of her bulking up and getting stronger so it wouldn't be a problem for her, nominally as a professionally sportsman that's what you would do if it was possible.

It's true to say this might not be a problem in F1 but of course it's not to say such things have never been a problem for women like with Calderon in F2, and who's to say they might not make the F1 cars harder to drive in the future, Hamilton already complained last season that the cars were too easy to drive.

It's just one aspect to consider on the back of recent statements by Calderon and JuJu Noda and perhaps it's more poignant with the likes of Calderon who is reasonable big and not small like Patrick and Noda, if it's so easy for a woman to get in shape like Tia then why couldn't Calderon do it?


It's not clearly untrue.

Any healthy young women could train up to be as strong as an average man. I've seen it done. Many, many times over.

You're 1/1000 may apply to the average population walking about. Maybe 1/1000 women would be naturally stronger than the average man without either under going any strength training. That, I agree, would be very rare.

But we aren't talking about that. The question that's important is do women have the potential to train up to being as strong as a male formula 1 driver. The answer to that to me is pretty clearly a yes.

You don't need to be as strong as Tia either. Nothing like that strong I would have thought. I just used her as an example to show what was possible.

Don't forget F2 and Indycar is a hell of a lot more physical than F1.

I think there's two things that you are confusing so I have to say no then yes, can a woman train to be as strong as a male F1 driver, a woman maybe, just any woman I would say no.

I would say that F1 drivers probably train just as hard as let's say tennis players, in that sport the women probably train just as hard as the men so then why are the women weaker?

However to the other part then maybe a yes that women in general can be strong enough to drive a F1 car competitively although we've yet to see one that's good enough to make it to that level, but like I say it's a fine line to draw given the likes of Patrick, Noda and Calderon have struggled physically in other single seater racing cars were their male competitors have not had a problem.


Oh, they would have to train differently that's for sure. Remember Rosberg talking about how he stopped cycling in order to lose muscle in his legs? A woman probably couldn't afford to do something like that.

It's one thing to say they can achieve certain physical levels and another thing for them to do it, lack of power steering seems to be something of a general handicap.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:51 pm 
Online

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 16668
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
Well she's probably one of these 1 in a thousand women, we seem to be going down this route that any woman can be as strong as a man and therefore can compete on an equal footing to a man which clearly is not true.

We've seen in the past the likes of Danica Patrick struggle to drive an Indycar on street and road courses because the cars didn't have power steering, why wasn't it a simple matter of her bulking up and getting stronger so it wouldn't be a problem for her, nominally as a professionally sportsman that's what you would do if it was possible.

It's true to say this might not be a problem in F1 but of course it's not to say such things have never been a problem for women like with Calderon in F2, and who's to say they might not make the F1 cars harder to drive in the future, Hamilton already complained last season that the cars were too easy to drive.

It's just one aspect to consider on the back of recent statements by Calderon and JuJu Noda and perhaps it's more poignant with the likes of Calderon who is reasonable big and not small like Patrick and Noda, if it's so easy for a woman to get in shape like Tia then why couldn't Calderon do it?


It's not clearly untrue.

Any healthy young women could train up to be as strong as an average man. I've seen it done. Many, many times over.

You're 1/1000 may apply to the average population walking about. Maybe 1/1000 women would be naturally stronger than the average man without either under going any strength training. That, I agree, would be very rare.

But we aren't talking about that. The question that's important is do women have the potential to train up to being as strong as a male formula 1 driver. The answer to that to me is pretty clearly a yes.

You don't need to be as strong as Tia either. Nothing like that strong I would have thought. I just used her as an example to show what was possible.

Don't forget F2 and Indycar is a hell of a lot more physical than F1.

I think there's two things that you are confusing so I have to say no then yes, can a woman train to be as strong as a male F1 driver, a woman maybe, just any woman I would say no.

I would say that F1 drivers probably train just as hard as let's say tennis players, in that sport the women probably train just as hard as the men so then why are the women weaker?

However to the other part then maybe a yes that women in general can be strong enough to drive a F1 car competitively although we've yet to see one that's good enough to make it to that level, but like I say it's a fine line to draw given the likes of Patrick, Noda and Calderon have struggled physically in other single seater racing cars were their male competitors have not had a problem.


Oh, they would have to train differently that's for sure. Remember Rosberg talking about how he stopped cycling in order to lose muscle in his legs? A woman probably couldn't afford to do something like that.

It's one thing to say they can achieve certain physical levels and another thing for them to do it, lack of power steering seems to be something of a general handicap.


Yes in F2. We haven't been talking about F2... I agree that is tougher.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
DOLOMITE wrote:
Battle Far wrote:
There are sports where women can compete equally with men physically such as aerobatics, fixed wing glider (not hang gliders) racing, show jumping, etc. F1 isn't one of them, Noda is 100% correct, women have to compensate for their physiological disadvantages with MORE training to compete with men.



Saying it's harder to get there isn't the same thing as it can't be done.

That being the case you would then have to ask just how serious some of these women are, Calderon apparently gave up on F2 because she found it physically too hard I believe?


I think it's well known F2 is more physical than F1.

Also, I was under the impression that not much was expected of Calderon in F2? I don't think her performances were out of the realms of what you would expect given her career up to that point.

Unfortunately that might be said of any of the female drivers presently competing, physicality is just one area to discuss which might be a limiting factor for them among other things like lack of numbers.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
It's not clearly untrue.

Any healthy young women could train up to be as strong as an average man. I've seen it done. Many, many times over.

You're 1/1000 may apply to the average population walking about. Maybe 1/1000 women would be naturally stronger than the average man without either under going any strength training. That, I agree, would be very rare.

But we aren't talking about that. The question that's important is do women have the potential to train up to being as strong as a male formula 1 driver. The answer to that to me is pretty clearly a yes.

You don't need to be as strong as Tia either. Nothing like that strong I would have thought. I just used her as an example to show what was possible.

Don't forget F2 and Indycar is a hell of a lot more physical than F1.

I think there's two things that you are confusing so I have to say no then yes, can a woman train to be as strong as a male F1 driver, a woman maybe, just any woman I would say no.

I would say that F1 drivers probably train just as hard as let's say tennis players, in that sport the women probably train just as hard as the men so then why are the women weaker?

However to the other part then maybe a yes that women in general can be strong enough to drive a F1 car competitively although we've yet to see one that's good enough to make it to that level, but like I say it's a fine line to draw given the likes of Patrick, Noda and Calderon have struggled physically in other single seater racing cars were their male competitors have not had a problem.


Oh, they would have to train differently that's for sure. Remember Rosberg talking about how he stopped cycling in order to lose muscle in his legs? A woman probably couldn't afford to do something like that.

It's one thing to say they can achieve certain physical levels and another thing for them to do it, lack of power steering seems to be something of a general handicap.


Yes in F2. We haven't been talking about F2... I agree that is tougher.

That's to highlight you can't ignore possible physical limitations, it's easy to say there will not being any of those kind of problems in F1.

The argument that a woman can simply train harder might not always be true as we see when they have to deal with cars with no power steering.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:20 pm 
Online

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 16668
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
I think there's two things that you are confusing so I have to say no then yes, can a woman train to be as strong as a male F1 driver, a woman maybe, just any woman I would say no.

I would say that F1 drivers probably train just as hard as let's say tennis players, in that sport the women probably train just as hard as the men so then why are the women weaker?

However to the other part then maybe a yes that women in general can be strong enough to drive a F1 car competitively although we've yet to see one that's good enough to make it to that level, but like I say it's a fine line to draw given the likes of Patrick, Noda and Calderon have struggled physically in other single seater racing cars were their male competitors have not had a problem.


Oh, they would have to train differently that's for sure. Remember Rosberg talking about how he stopped cycling in order to lose muscle in his legs? A woman probably couldn't afford to do something like that.

It's one thing to say they can achieve certain physical levels and another thing for them to do it, lack of power steering seems to be something of a general handicap.


Yes in F2. We haven't been talking about F2... I agree that is tougher.

That's to highlight you can't ignore possible physical limitations, it's easy to say there will not being any of those kind of problems in F1.

The argument that a woman can simply train harder might not always be true as we see when they have to deal with cars with no power steering.


OK to state the obvious -

I am saying they can overcome a physical disadvantage to be capable in F1.

That does not mean they can overcome any possible physical disadvantage. The more strength becomes a factor the harder it becomes.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
Oh, they would have to train differently that's for sure. Remember Rosberg talking about how he stopped cycling in order to lose muscle in his legs? A woman probably couldn't afford to do something like that.

It's one thing to say they can achieve certain physical levels and another thing for them to do it, lack of power steering seems to be something of a general handicap.


Yes in F2. We haven't been talking about F2... I agree that is tougher.

That's to highlight you can't ignore possible physical limitations, it's easy to say there will not being any of those kind of problems in F1.

The argument that a woman can simply train harder might not always be true as we see when they have to deal with cars with no power steering.


OK to state the obvious -

I am saying they can overcome a physical disadvantage to be capable in F1.

That does not mean they can overcome any possible physical disadvantage. The more strength becomes a factor the harder it becomes.

I'm saying you don't know that until you have actual proof, I would say that Noda is the first female to actually highlight the issue and she's only driving a low powered single seater.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:31 pm 
Online

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 16668
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
It's one thing to say they can achieve certain physical levels and another thing for them to do it, lack of power steering seems to be something of a general handicap.


Yes in F2. We haven't been talking about F2... I agree that is tougher.

That's to highlight you can't ignore possible physical limitations, it's easy to say there will not being any of those kind of problems in F1.

The argument that a woman can simply train harder might not always be true as we see when they have to deal with cars with no power steering.


OK to state the obvious -

I am saying they can overcome a physical disadvantage to be capable in F1.

That does not mean they can overcome any possible physical disadvantage. The more strength becomes a factor the harder it becomes.

I'm saying you don't know that until you have actual proof, I would say that Noda is the first female to actually highlight the issue and she's only driving a low powered single seater.


Ok, we don't know for certain in the way that almost nothing can be known for absolute certain. What we do know for certain though is that young women who under going strength training can gain strength to a level that far exceeds the usual strength of a man in his late teens of F1 build.

That's only the level they need to get to. They don't need super strength.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 8:07 am
Posts: 1302
pokerman wrote:
...Calderon apparently gave up on F2 because she found it physically too hard I believe?


No, not at all:

"We don’t have any defined plans yet, I’m still staying out for testing to see if something comes up but to be honest it’s looking very difficult to stay in F2. The budget is a big issue at the moment as well. So we are looking at other opportunities at the moment, still [keeping in] mind that I want to reach F1"

_________________
"I'd rather lose a race going fast enough to win it, than win one going slow enough to lose it".
-Stirling Moss


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2014 8:26 pm
Posts: 244
Having had her race 8 win taken away for what appeared to me to be an innocuous jump start, Chadwick secured her first official podium in race 10 of the F3 Asia series at Sepang this weekend.

Image

The race video is available here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY4V9j0vkGM

In a wet race with a slowly drying track she was slower than Doohan (1st) and Alders (2nd) but passed Mazepin on the track and looked pretty competitive


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2014 8:26 pm
Posts: 244
mikeyg123 wrote:
I'm saying you don't know that until you have actual proof, I would say that Noda is the first female to actually highlight the issue and she's only driving a low powered single seater.
Not true, she extensively tested/raced an F3 car over the past two years and has tested sports cars. She may be just 14 and a girl but give her some credit, she's actually done what most of us dream about.


Last edited by Battle Far on Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2014 8:26 pm
Posts: 244
mikeyg123 wrote:
I 100% disagree on just about every point by I respect your opinion. Apart from calling me misogynistic. I don't respect that. Given the context of my posts is just weird. I'm saying women can do these things. I feel to see how that can possibly show any prejudice against women.

Edit- Hang on your last sentence is exactly what I have been saying! They would have to do more strength training to get to the required strength to drive an F1 car quickly.
Misogynistic = A tongue in cheek reference to your "chunky" quote.

Exactly, if they have to do more training to compete they are at a disadvantage :nod:

Of course you are entitled to your opinion but a friendly piece of advice, if a girl ever asks you "Does my bum look big in this?", no response with with "chunky" in it is acceptable ;)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:40 pm 
Online

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 16668
Battle Far wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
I'm saying you don't know that until you have actual proof, I would say that Noda is the first female to actually highlight the issue and she's only driving a low powered single seater.
Not true, she extensively tested/raced an F3 car over the past two years and has tested sports cars. She may be just 14 and a girl but give her some credit, she's actually done what most of us dream about.


This isn't my quote.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:41 pm 
Online

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 16668
Battle Far wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
I 100% disagree on just about every point by I respect your opinion. Apart from calling me misogynistic. I don't respect that. Given the context of my posts is just weird. I'm saying women can do these things. I feel to see how that can possibly show any prejudice against women.

Edit- Hang on your last sentence is exactly what I have been saying! They would have to do more strength training to get to the required strength to drive an F1 car quickly.
Misogynistic = A tongue in cheek reference to your "chunky" quote.

Exactly, if they have to do more training to compete they are at a disadvantage :nod:

Of course you are entitled to your opinion but a friendly piece of advice, if a girl ever asks you "Does my bum look big in this?", no response with with "chunky" in it is acceptable ;)


I'm not so sure about that anymore... The current trend is toward a chunkier, more muscular look.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 1:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
pokerman wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
Yes in F2. We haven't been talking about F2... I agree that is tougher.

That's to highlight you can't ignore possible physical limitations, it's easy to say there will not being any of those kind of problems in F1.

The argument that a woman can simply train harder might not always be true as we see when they have to deal with cars with no power steering.


OK to state the obvious -

I am saying they can overcome a physical disadvantage to be capable in F1.

That does not mean they can overcome any possible physical disadvantage. The more strength becomes a factor the harder it becomes.

I'm saying you don't know that until you have actual proof, I would say that Noda is the first female to actually highlight the issue and she's only driving a low powered single seater.


Ok, we don't know for certain in the way that almost nothing can be known for absolute certain. What we do know for certain though is that young women who under going strength training can gain strength to a level that far exceeds the usual strength of a man in his late teens of F1 build.

That's only the level they need to get to. They don't need super strength.

So why then would cars without power steering be a problem?

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 1:46 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
DOLOMITE wrote:
pokerman wrote:
...Calderon apparently gave up on F2 because she found it physically too hard I believe?


No, not at all:

"We don’t have any defined plans yet, I’m still staying out for testing to see if something comes up but to be honest it’s looking very difficult to stay in F2. The budget is a big issue at the moment as well. So we are looking at other opportunities at the moment, still [keeping in] mind that I want to reach F1"

Yeah I also came across that when looking for the actual quote but I definitely heard that the physicality of the F2 car was a problem for her in particular the absence of power steering which wouldn't be a problem with the car in the Japanese Super Formula.

Now I don't know if these cars have power steering or not but I've just checked and yes they have power steering on the Japanese Super Formula cars.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 2:05 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
Battle Far wrote:
Having had her race 8 win taken away for what appeared to me to be an innocuous jump start, Chadwick secured her first official podium in race 10 of the F3 Asia series at Sepang this weekend.

Image

The race video is available here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY4V9j0vkGM

In a wet race with a slowly drying track she was slower than Doohan (1st) and Alders (2nd) but passed Mazepin on the track and looked pretty competitive

Yeah I recently watched the race, I'm glad I didn't come on here first because it would have spoiled the race for me.

Chadwick qualified 5th in the dry I believe, the race was wet on a drying track, all the drivers competed on wet tyres, in these conditions I thought she would have fallen backwards like she did before when it was wet but this time she was competitive so a very credible performance.

It's nice to see a woman being competitive unlike what we tend to see with them running near the back, one thing to consider though that one or two stronger drivers have dropped out of the series and this is not mainstream F3, the driver who's leading the series I would be surprised if anyone has heard of him before that being Joey Alders.

However I'm still quite impressed and her racecraft was very good, something that I thought was maybe a bit sketchy when I watched her in the 'W' series, she had no problems toughing it out with the male drivers.

Another good thing for her is that she's only 21 so she's time to gain any relative experience, she needs to be driving next season in the mainstream F3 series and placed in a good team and let's see what she can do.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 2:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
Battle Far wrote:
mikeyg123 wrote:
I'm saying you don't know that until you have actual proof, I would say that Noda is the first female to actually highlight the issue and she's only driving a low powered single seater.
Not true, she extensively tested/raced an F3 car over the past two years and has tested sports cars. She may be just 14 and a girl but give her some credit, she's actually done what most of us dream about.

That's my post and I'm a bit confused by the reply. :?

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 2:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
I've just watched the second race live, Chadwick was quick enough to finish 2nd but finished 4th, Mazepin in 2nd was basically being protected by his teammate who is not eligible for points but I think is just there to help him.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:08 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 8:07 am
Posts: 1302
pokerman wrote:
I've just watched the second race live, Chadwick was quick enough to finish 2nd but finished 4th, Mazepin in 2nd was basically being protected by his teammate who is not eligible for points but I think is just there to help him.


Finished 4th but classified 3rd as Sasahara not eligible for points. Just watching race 12.

Hadn't noticed that Koyama had also joined the series.

_________________
"I'd rather lose a race going fast enough to win it, than win one going slow enough to lose it".
-Stirling Moss


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
DOLOMITE wrote:
pokerman wrote:
I've just watched the second race live, Chadwick was quick enough to finish 2nd but finished 4th, Mazepin in 2nd was basically being protected by his teammate who is not eligible for points but I think is just there to help him.


Finished 4th but classified 3rd as Sasahara not eligible for points. Just watching race 12.

Hadn't noticed that Koyama had also joined the series.

Would Koyama be any good?

Chadwick a bit off the pace in race 3.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 8:07 am
Posts: 1302
pokerman wrote:
DOLOMITE wrote:
pokerman wrote:
I've just watched the second race live, Chadwick was quick enough to finish 2nd but finished 4th, Mazepin in 2nd was basically being protected by his teammate who is not eligible for points but I think is just there to help him.


Finished 4th but classified 3rd as Sasahara not eligible for points. Just watching race 12.

Hadn't noticed that Koyama had also joined the series.

Would Koyama be any good?

Chadwick a bit off the pace in race 3.


Koyama wasn't bad but didn't really shine.

Looks like Chadwick wasn't classified 3 but stayed 4th? for the 2nd race?

Spoiler (click to show)


Calderon not racing this weekend.

Doohan could nick the title if he keeps that form up.

_________________
"I'd rather lose a race going fast enough to win it, than win one going slow enough to lose it".
-Stirling Moss


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:04 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
DOLOMITE wrote:
pokerman wrote:
DOLOMITE wrote:
pokerman wrote:
I've just watched the second race live, Chadwick was quick enough to finish 2nd but finished 4th, Mazepin in 2nd was basically being protected by his teammate who is not eligible for points but I think is just there to help him.


Finished 4th but classified 3rd as Sasahara not eligible for points. Just watching race 12.

Hadn't noticed that Koyama had also joined the series.

Would Koyama be any good?

Chadwick a bit off the pace in race 3.


Koyama wasn't bad but didn't really shine.

Looks like Chadwick wasn't classified 3 but stayed 4th? for the 2nd race?

Spoiler (click to show)


Calderon not racing this weekend.

Doohan could nick the title if he keeps that form up.

No with Koyama you made it sound like he was a known driver, yes Chadwick is classified 4th but she scored points for 3rd place, I've just seen that Koyoma is actually another female driver.

6th in race 12 after some good passes sort of overlooks that there was basically only 8 cars in the race, one of which stalled at the start from grid 2.

Yes it's now a 2 horse race between Doohan and Alders, Alders could probably hope for some wet races.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 3:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2014 8:26 pm
Posts: 244
pokerman wrote:
DOLOMITE wrote:
pokerman wrote:
I've just watched the second race live, Chadwick was quick enough to finish 2nd but finished 4th, Mazepin in 2nd was basically being protected by his teammate who is not eligible for points but I think is just there to help him.
Finished 4th but classified 3rd as Sasahara not eligible for points. Just watching race 12.

Hadn't noticed that Koyama had also joined the series.
Would Koyama be any good?

Chadwick a bit off the pace in race 3.
Koyama was 7th in the 2019 W series with some competitive races where she ran 3rd/4th for a while but never finished on the podium.

The variation in lap times is surprising, Chadwick recorded the 5th fastest lap in race 10 (wet), 2nd fastest in race 11 (dry) but only 7th fastest in race 12 (dry) more than 1.5s off the pace. It seems to me that there must be something peculiar with the tyres, perhaps there are 'good' sets and 'bad' sets or perhaps they can't have a new set for every race.

I note that Chadwick's relative performance was much stronger at Sepang for races 10-12 than it was at the same track in races 1-3. Her fastest laps were 2s off the pace of the mean of the podiums the first weekend, now well under a second off in the 4th weekend where she was comfortably the fastest of the 4 drivers in her team. I'm encouraged that she appears to be learning!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 5:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 33704
Battle Far wrote:
pokerman wrote:
DOLOMITE wrote:
pokerman wrote:
I've just watched the second race live, Chadwick was quick enough to finish 2nd but finished 4th, Mazepin in 2nd was basically being protected by his teammate who is not eligible for points but I think is just there to help him.
Finished 4th but classified 3rd as Sasahara not eligible for points. Just watching race 12.

Hadn't noticed that Koyama had also joined the series.
Would Koyama be any good?

Chadwick a bit off the pace in race 3.
Koyama was 7th in the 2019 W series with some competitive races where she ran 3rd/4th for a while but never finished on the podium.

The variation in lap times is surprising, Chadwick recorded the 5th fastest lap in race 10 (wet), 2nd fastest in race 11 (dry) but only 7th fastest in race 12 (dry) more than 1.5s off the pace. It seems to me that there must be something peculiar with the tyres, perhaps there are 'good' sets and 'bad' sets or perhaps they can't have a new set for every race.

I note that Chadwick's relative performance was much stronger at Sepang for races 10-12 than it was at the same track in races 1-3. Her fastest laps were 2s off the pace of the mean of the podiums the first weekend, now well under a second off in the 4th weekend where she was comfortably the fastest of the 4 drivers in her team. I'm encouraged that she appears to be learning!

Right I remember Koyama from the 'W' Series, in respect to the tyres I think they must be poor quality, after the last race Alders said he changed one set of tyres for another and there was a second difference in lap time. I would be guessing that might affect the durability of the tyres as well with them sometimes dropping off a cliff in the races.

In the third race Alders was able to run at the same pace as the winner Doohan, but in the second race Alders was running in second place and he said the rear tyres were destoyed and he ended up finishing 8th.

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: amirb, Bancieri, Clarky, mikeyg123, Siao7 and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group