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PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 8:22 pm 
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sandman1347 wrote:
Ducati....How do they manage to end up high and dry here? Don't get me wrong, I'm happy for Petricci but Ducati can't seem to get their act together with riders. They will go into next season still lacking a true top-shelf rider IMO. They had one with Lorenzo but it took them too long to figure things out.

I'm definitely looking forward to watching Jorge for the rest of this season to see how things look at Ducati now that he's gotten his act together. I actually don't think Mugello is a one-off. I see it as a turning point. More than that, I look forward to see Jorge vs. Marc next year. Should be interesting.

So I'm assuming that yamaha are standing pat with their lineup? Suzuki have gone with Rinz and Mir. I suppose that settles things for the silly season then?



Just waiting on the Marc VDS/Petronas/Yamaha Customer team mess to sort itself out. If it does; Pedrosa and Morbidelli?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 11:29 pm 
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Yep, Shoot, that’s the likely team.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:39 am 
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Cold Gin wrote:

Yeah I didn't expect Lorenzo to take that challenge, that would be a bit like Vettel going to Mercedes to take on Hamilton, like you say mind blowing.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:40 am 
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Exediron wrote:
Cold Gin wrote:
OFFICIAL—LORENZO TO HONDA!!!!

Mercedes needs to take a lesson here. This is what the fans want! :thumbup:

But not Ferrari? ;)

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:41 am 
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sandman1347 wrote:
Ducati....How do they manage to end up high and dry here? Don't get me wrong, I'm happy for Petricci but Ducati can't seem to get their act together with riders. They will go into next season still lacking a true top-shelf rider IMO. They had one with Lorenzo but it took them too long to figure things out.

I'm definitely looking forward to watching Jorge for the rest of this season to see how things look at Ducati now that he's gotten his act together. I actually don't think Mugello is a one-off. I see it as a turning point. More than that, I look forward to see Jorge vs. Marc next year. Should be interesting.

So I'm assuming that yamaha are standing pat with their lineup? Suzuki have gone with Rinz and Mir. I suppose that settles things for the silly season then?

Not really, what happens with Pedrosa?

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:45 am 
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Cold Gin wrote:
Sandman---Yes sir, Vinales and Rossi both extended to 2020 earlier this year.

KTM has Zarco and Espargaro next year, and now the next big name is Iannone, who I read in the flurry of all of this other news, is going to be replacing Scott Redding at Aprilia. Suzuki has Rins signed for this year and the next, and it is all but a formality that they will be announcing Joan Mir for next year on a two-year deal.

I agree with you----it will be very interesting to see how much Vengeance Lorenzo rides with now, as I believe he will want to stick it to Ducati for not believing in him and not providing him with the requested updates until now, which he requested after the test in Thailand before the season started. Also, I read that Ducati, while making noises that weren't positive about Lorenzo prior to last week, hadn't officially told him to look elsewhere---rather, he had already talked to Honda and after the race and made the pronouncement that it was "too late". So really, Ducati seems to have significant egg on their face here. Which doesn't surprise me, they have been this way in the past. When Stoner was winning, they told Melandra "the bike wins, you need to ride it differently", a very binary approach and not very helpful. Now, mind you, Melandri wasn't that great of a rider in GP, but the groundwork of that mentality from the factory was laid then. It continued with Hayden, and it continued with Rossi, at least in terms of them not being very good at listening and adapting. And so now the same, with Lorenzo.

It makes the Lorenzo V. Dovizioso matchup the rest of the season potentially VERY contentious. Dovi has an outside shot at the title if something happens to MM93 a few more times like in Mugello. He can't beat Marquez I think over the balance on speed, but if Marquez has brain farts like he is prone to, Dovi, with good finishes, is in with a shout. Except for the fact that Lorenzo might now be on to something---will the team ask him to pull over, and if so, will he do it,should he be in front and challenging?

Montmelo will be buzzing with electricity now, even moreso than normal!!!

Lorenzo will not pull over for Dovi he has already shown that a few times before, are you forgetting the 3 bike crash with Lorenzo, Dovi and Pedrosa, all because basically Lorenzo would not wave Dovi past.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 5:20 pm 
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Nope, not forgetting it at all. I just wonder how blatant will they be about it, and if they will punish Lorenzo if he refuses to make way.

If he truly has found the fix to his issues with the newly configured fuel tank, he might be challenging regularly, which will put him and Dovi together often on track fighting for the same positions. Which of course, will provide great theater for us all.

On other matters, It'll be interesting to see this team of Pedrosa and Morbidelli if Petronas is able to make it happen. Morbidelli seems like a future star in the making.

I think a major story next year will be Zarco on the factory KTM ride. Will he be able to push that project forward? They have the engineering and financial wherewithal, I hope it can come to fruition.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:40 pm 
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Think everyones getting a bit carried away with Jorge/Honda being unbelievable. Pedrosa was on the podium in 1/2 of the races last year and managed 2 wins.

I like Petrucci but don't see him as a title contender at all.

Think KTM have missed a trick with not getting Pedrosa.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:03 pm 
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pokerman wrote:
Exediron wrote:
Cold Gin wrote:
OFFICIAL—LORENZO TO HONDA!!!!

Mercedes needs to take a lesson here. This is what the fans want! :thumbup:

But not Ferrari? ;)

Hamilton is more like Marquez (in terms of being the dominant driver of the era) which is why I picked Mercedes. But Ferrari too - fans want to see as many top drivers crammed into the same teams as possible, tbh.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:01 am 
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https://twitter.com/motomatters/status/ ... 3971416066

Pedrosa to retire?


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 12:56 pm 
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shoot999 wrote:
https://twitter.com/motomatters/status/1004478203971416066

Pedrosa to retire?

Honestly I'm happy if he does. That dude has broken more bones than any rider I can think of. Why bother racing for a smaller team? If you can't win a championship it's not worth the risk at this stage.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 5:57 pm 
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Cold Gin wrote:
Nope, not forgetting it at all. I just wonder how blatant will they be about it, and if they will punish Lorenzo if he refuses to make way.

If he truly has found the fix to his issues with the newly configured fuel tank, he might be challenging regularly, which will put him and Dovi together often on track fighting for the same positions. Which of course, will provide great theater for us all.

On other matters, It'll be interesting to see this team of Pedrosa and Morbidelli if Petronas is able to make it happen. Morbidelli seems like a future star in the making.

I think a major story next year will be Zarco on the factory KTM ride. Will he be able to push that project forward? They have the engineering and financial wherewithal, I hope it can come to fruition.

I think you are also forgetting the end of last season when everything was on the line for Dovi and Marquez yet twice Lorenzo did not wave Dovi past, in the first instance Dovi crticised him for it.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 5:59 pm 
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Exediron wrote:
pokerman wrote:
Exediron wrote:
Cold Gin wrote:
OFFICIAL—LORENZO TO HONDA!!!!

Mercedes needs to take a lesson here. This is what the fans want! :thumbup:

But not Ferrari? ;)

Hamilton is more like Marquez (in terms of being the dominant driver of the era) which is why I picked Mercedes. But Ferrari too - fans want to see as many top drivers crammed into the same teams as possible, tbh.

Well in this case I quite like the reasoning. :)

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:01 pm 
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shoot999 wrote:
https://twitter.com/motomatters/status/1004478203971416066

Pedrosa to retire?

I guess the only options were further down the grid so best to retire with dignity.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 4:44 pm 
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Confirmed--Andrea Iannone to Aprilia, two year deal through 2020. This very likely leaves Scott Redding without a ride for next year.



https://www.crash.net/motogp/news/89776 ... witch-2019

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 9:45 pm 
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Cold Gin wrote:
Confirmed--Andrea Iannone to Aprilia, two year deal through 2020. This very likely leaves Scott Redding without a ride for next year.



https://www.crash.net/motogp/news/89776 ... witch-2019

And rightfully so. Redding hasn't performed of late at all.

So Alex Marquez won't be riding in the premiere class next season it seems and with this being his 4th year in Moto@, I really think a switch to WSBK is on the cards for the younger Marquez. Probably for the best if it happens. Racing in MotoGP would place him firmly in his brother's shadow for the rest of his career. In WSBK, he can carve out his own niche.

I also have to wonder about the likes of Bagnaia and Baldassarri. Bagnaia in particular is leading the championship in Moto2 and is actually 2 years younger than Oliveira (who already has secured a MotoGP seat for 2019). If he holds on to win the championship, it will be a real shame that there isn't a seat available for him.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:27 pm 
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Bagnaia has a Ducati contract with Pramac next year

WSBK is garbage. Theres no point leaving the front of Moto2 to go there.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 11:36 am 
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Zazu wrote:
Think everyones getting a bit carried away with Jorge/Honda being unbelievable. Pedrosa was on the podium in 1/2 of the races last year and managed 2 wins.

I like Petrucci but don't see him as a title contender at all.

Think KTM have missed a trick with not getting Pedrosa.


By almost all accounts it is shocking. Not the quality of the Honda ride—-rather, the fact they would go after Lorenzo at all. Of course, it may have been surprising to them that Zarco turned them down, Mir wasn’t accessible and they finally called time on Pedrosa. Which I think is undoubtedly the right call, as he’s been having a poor season, and well, it’s just time. So probably the confluence of events served up Lorenzo at the right time, but nobody seemed to see it coming. Good fit too, considering he’s Spanish which certainly won’t harm the team from the Repsol sponsorship angle.

Petrucci seems to be universally loved at Ducati but we’ll see how long that lasts when riding for the factory team. It’s one thing to punch above your weight st Pramac, but the expectations now will be high, as will be the pressure. I share your assessment, I do not view him as title contender, either.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:50 pm 
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Zazu wrote:
Bagnaia has a Ducati contract with Pramac next year

WSBK is garbage. Theres no point leaving the front of Moto2 to go there.

Premac is a pretty good ride. Good for him.

I haven't seen this discussed in this thread but what do you guys think of the new Moto2 bikes for next year? They will be ditching the 600cc Honda engine from the CBR600 and using the 765cc engines from the Triumph Daytona (the one that will be unveiled for 2019). It's interesting to me that they are beefing up the Moto2 engine but not the Moto3 engine. I think it's glaringly obvious that Moto3 needs more power as right now the slipstream effect makes it impossible for a rider to break away even if he is significantly faster than the others. I'd like to see a change in the Moto3 engine up to about 350cc. Perhaps they can use the KTM 375cc engines...

But the new Moto2 bikes will have a displacement just slightly below the 800cc bikes that were raced in the premiere class a few years ago! That's pretty jarring. Perhaps even MotoGP will soon see a jump to 1200cc?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:44 pm 
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The only increase in Moto3 would be to 300cc as its more real world relevant. The entire point of the class is small engines, only a few years back the lower classes were 125s and 250s then MotoGP

Moto2 the engine they currently use is archaic so its good just to see a new engine and some modern technology

No chance MotoGP will go bigger


Im away at Le Mans this weekend but I think MotoGP Catlaunya is going to be one for the ages. Its only low temperatures and the new surface is mega grippy so Yamaha should be there. Wouldnt suprise me if Ducati/Yamaha/Suzuki or Honda won


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:04 pm 
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Current MotoGP bikes are probably already too fast, any increase in displacement and they'd have over 300bhp and probably go 240mph if you had enough of a straight. They continually are able to squeeze more power out of the engines each year, it's alarming. If they didn't have the electronics they do now there wouldn't be any riders left, it'd be a high side show until they were all in the hospital. Much as I hate to say it, a rev limit wouldn't be a bad idea at this point. I read somewhere that the KTM is producing in excess of 270bhp. That's unreal, given how light the bikes are.

Regarding Moto2, I can't wait to hear what the triumph engine sound like, it being a triple. It's an odd choice, though--it's based off of the street triple, which is a naked bike, not a sports bike, per se. I imaging they will howl like F1-V-10's, which makes me a happy guy, as I loved that banshee wail. I rode a speed triple about 10 years ago, and it was an absolute riot, and the song from the engine---it must be experienced to be believed, trust me.

I definitely agree about Moto3 needing a bit more motor. 300's would be cool.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:10 pm 
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Zazu wrote:
The only increase in Moto3 would be to 300cc as its more real world relevant. The entire point of the class is small engines, only a few years back the lower classes were 125s and 250s then MotoGP

Moto2 the engine they currently use is archaic so its good just to see a new engine and some modern technology

No chance MotoGP will go bigger


Im away at Le Mans this weekend but I think MotoGP Catlaunya is going to be one for the ages. Its only low temperatures and the new surface is mega grippy so Yamaha should be there. Wouldnt suprise me if Ducati/Yamaha/Suzuki or Honda won

I thought the whole real-world relevance thing was important too but how often do you see 765cc bikes? Moto2 is moving in a more esoteric direction and I think Moto3 can too. The problem now is that being very small/light weight is too large of an advantage in Moto3. The slipstream effect is just more powerful than the bikes themselves so it is hard to break away even if you are the fastest and the smaller guys just have it way too easy on those bikes. It's seriously a massive disadvantage at this point.

I would take 300cc bikes as an improvement but it might not be enough to get rid of the sort of artificial rubber-banding that we have now. As for bikes being 125cc back in the day; those were 2-stroke bikes man. Totally different beast. You actually could break away from the field on a 125.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:04 pm 
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True that, take it from a guy who used to race on 2 stroke motocross bikes :] ---TOTALLY different beast.

I actually loved watching the 2-stroke 125's. They seemed much more dynamic than 250 four-strokes now.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:15 pm 
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Cold Gin wrote:
True that, take it from a guy who used to race on 2 stroke motocross bikes :] ---TOTALLY different beast.

I actually loved watching the 2-stroke 125's. They seemed much more dynamic than 250 four-strokes now.

The first motorcycle I ever rode was a 125cc 2-stroke dirt bike lol. I agree that the old 125s were a lot better than today's Moto3 bikes. I actually prefer the 250 strokers to the current Moto2 bikes as well.

Overall I get the sense that the new Moto2 bike for next year will be a lot closer to the MotoGP bikes than it is to Moto3. For me, Moto3 doesn't serve much of a purpose when the style of racing is completely different from what you have in the higher classes. I also think some of the bigger riders can just wash out of Moto3 but would probably be successful on the larger bikes; which is a huge waste of talent. Bulega seems to be the latest casualty.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:11 pm 
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600cc sport bikes is a tiny market these days.

Think Moto3 is great for learning. There corner speed is similar to motogp plus its great for racecraft. The 125s and 250s had big gaps because the gulf between the rich and poor teams

Bulegas career is looking pretty much over and its not just due to his height. Loads of riders excelled in junior championships and then didn't make the jump. The hype around Quartaro was unreal because he dominated all the junior classes but he hasn't done anything at all.

I still don't think Dorna have achieved getting more nationalities of riders. The future is looking vr46 and Spanish dominated. There's no young brits as all looking promising which is catastrophic considering crutchlows won races and Danny kent was a world champion. It also baffles me how they haven't managed to get top Asian riders. I know Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia etc are poor countries but motorbikes are life over there


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:31 pm 
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Zazu wrote:
600cc sport bikes is a tiny market these days.

Think Moto3 is great for learning. There corner speed is similar to motogp plus its great for racecraft. The 125s and 250s had big gaps because the gulf between the rich and poor teams

Bulegas career is looking pretty much over and its not just due to his height. Loads of riders excelled in junior championships and then didn't make the jump. The hype around Quartaro was unreal because he dominated all the junior classes but he hasn't done anything at all.

I still don't think Dorna have achieved getting more nationalities of riders. The future is looking vr46 and Spanish dominated. There's no young brits as all looking promising which is catastrophic considering crutchlows won races and Danny kent was a world champion. It also baffles me how they haven't managed to get top Asian riders. I know Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia etc are poor countries but motorbikes are life over there

I disagree that the ability to break away from the pack on a 125 was based on the difference in wealth of teams. There are still huge gulfs between the budgets of the top teams and the others but riders can hang on to the back of that top team just by slipstreaming them down the straights. It's totally normal to see a Moto3 race where the top 20 riders are covered by 5 seconds at the finish line. Guys can just hang on and get dragged around the track for the entire race and it adds more of a lottery/luck element to the races than I think is ideal.

With regards to getting riders from different nationalities; I totally agree that this is an issue of concern. There are several factors that I think have created this situation but I completely agree that Spain and Italy seem to be the only suppliers of top talent these last 7-8 years. USA used to have many great champions in MotoGP back in the 80s and 90s but there hasn't been a good American prospect since Ben Spies (and that was almost a decade ago). Australia is another country where legendary riders have hailed from but right now, Jack Miller is the only Aussie that's even in the mix. We used to have many Japanese riders including several champions in the 125cc and 250cc classes but there hasn't been a Japanese champion in any category since Aoyama in 2009.

What I see is that the same 2 or 3 teams seem to dominate the proceedings in Moto2 and Moto3 and the Asian, Australian, American and otherwise non-European riders almost never get seats on those teams. I see that the pipeline to MotoGP is not truly open to all. In the lower categories, there seems to be a lot more politics these days than there was just a few years ago. Getting with the right team in the lower categories matter quite a lot actually. If you are not associated with KTM, Marc VDS, VR-46, etc.; you are not going to do much winning.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 7:39 pm 
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I slag of quartararo and he goes and gets his first pole

I think moto2 has been really poor last few years but this years it's much better. Each race could be 4-5potential winners to choose from.

Very few moto3 races have a pack of 20. Once the fast guys up the pace in the closing laps it dwindles

Hoping Dovi wins tomorrow


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:11 pm 
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Moto3-I'm less and less impressed with this Moto3 crop. None of them can consistently stay on the bike. Martin is certainly the fastest but he's had too many DNFs and he's already 20 years old. He should be better at avoiding trouble by now.

Moto2-Great ride from Oliveira and yeah, I found it funny how Zazu just mentioned Quatararo in this thread and then he wins from pole the next race lol. Very impressive ride from him and a long time coming. Perhaps this is the breakthrough we've been waiting for. Certainly this guys seemed to have a ton of potential when we first saw him in Moto3 3 years ago.

MotoGP-So Ducati have really screwed up big time. It's clear that this ergonomic change was all that Jorge needed and it took them a year and change to provide that? Now Jorge seems to be back in top form and they have already lost him to Honda. Honda will have two riders who are both better than Ducati's two.

I'll tell you another thing; Lorenzo can win the championship. Odds are against it and I expect Marquez to go on another win streak when we get back to the Honda circuits but Jorge is still alive in the championship. Certainly I expect him to beat Dovi in the points this year; which will feel good I'm sure.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:42 pm 
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Lorenzos 69points behind Marquez. Just been at 2 Ducati tracks. Marquez already has one hand on the title.

No idea where that Quartararo performance came from. Maybe he's got a new seat as well?

No idea what Martins doing. I don't think this is a stellar crop in moto3 and with his pace and experience its unreal he keeps messing up his championship so regularly


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 3:57 pm 
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Rossi himself said it's crazy how early the contracts have been made this year and now we see both Ducati and Suzuki are going to be severely weakened for next year.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 7:10 am 
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Loved how Canet was being smart and let Bastianini drive at his pace to reel in the leaders, even protecting Bastianini from attacks by tucking in and battling hard to get P2 back as soon as he could every time. Great stuff. Too bad he got wiped out (bit of a racing incident, nobody really at fault).

That rocket start by Oliveira, P17 to ? by T1? That was huge. Should fix his qualifying issues though, he isn't going to pull this off every time and could bite him in the championship.

GP... Well, bit boring no? I wonder if Lorenzo's move won't turn out to be a lose-lose decision. With Lorenzo now getting to grips with it, he could have got a title shot next year maybe. But moving to Honda might mean Ducati doesn't have the riders to win with their bike, and Lorenzo facing the toughest opponent in MotoGP and very much at risk of being dominated there.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 9:13 pm 
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I was out of town last week on vacation and didn't get to see this race until last night. And i purposely didn't watch the news/get online because I didn't want to know, and luckily didn't, until I watched the race back at home (I was on a beach).

Yes, Ducati have an omelette the size of Florence all over their face, and it's pathetic the back-peddling we are seeing now from them. Tardozzi saying "We always knew he would win", when, just last month, he was saying nothing of the sort, nothing positive, now this save-face BS. In fact, the reversal of Lorenzo there, in the span of less than a month, has been utterly shocking. Now, we have Petrucci and Miller, who both had poor races yesterday, not quite showing the brass balls they thought they had a few weeks back when they were both eagerly discussing their prospects on the factory bike. And now Dovi, who was once full of bravado, now seems quite a bit meeker with his enormous errors in the past few races, all entirely self-inflicted. It happens, and nothing against them, but I have to smile all the same. Lorenzo has been getting an absolute beating from all corners of the world, on the internet and in print (heck, I've said a few things), and when he finally gets what he's been asking for, he wins two on the trot on pure pace alone. I must say I never thought he should retire and knew unlocking the Ducati would be difficult, but people have been outrageous suggesting he's past it, out of shape, has no motivation. All of this, utter bollocks. On balance, it seems that fault lies more with Ducati than Lorenzo if the stories out there are to be believed.

All that said, we all should be elated---and if Lorenzo can keep the pressure on, ride fast and error-free, we are in for a treat with several races left to go. The last two races suggest exactly that. Additionally, there are tracks that will not favor the Ducati as much, or Lorenzo, who loves both Mugello and Catalunya, so he will certainly be put to the test in Assen and places like the Sachsenring---however, on several more flowing and faster circuits such as Brno, Phillip Island, Aragon and Malaysia, Lorenzo and Ducati on paper should be strong. Very intriguing.

If Lorenzo keeps winning, and Marquez gets the red mist that he so often cannot say no to, we have something quite interesting on our hands. Especially if Dovi and Vinales can get it together. I think Vinales is going through something similar to Lorenzo, Yamaha needs to come up with a fix for him. He doesn't lack speed, fitness, motivation. Dare I say Rossi has led development away from what he prefers?

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 10:19 pm 
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https://www.autosport.com/motogp/news/1 ... -at-ducati

Not even a month ago. Funny, that a piece of plastic was all that was needed for Lorenzo's "Approach" to work.

Lorenzo was right to leave, although personally I would have loved it if he would have stayed. Dovi better be careful. He might just get his posterior handed to him by the guy that just a few weeks ago, he was looking down on. The Spartan has risen! :) :) :)

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 11:48 pm 
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Cold Gin wrote:
I was out of town last week on vacation and didn't get to see this race until last night. And i purposely didn't watch the news/get online because I didn't want to know, and luckily didn't, until I watched the race back at home (I was on a beach).

Yes, Ducati have an omelette the size of Florence all over their face, and it's pathetic the back-peddling we are seeing now from them. Tardozzi saying "We always knew he would win", when, just last month, he was saying nothing of the sort, nothing positive, now this save-face BS. In fact, the reversal of Lorenzo there, in the span of less than a month, has been utterly shocking. Now, we have Petrucci and Miller, who both had poor races yesterday, not quite showing the brass balls they thought they had a few weeks back when they were both eagerly discussing their prospects on the factory bike. And now Dovi, who was once full of bravado, now seems quite a bit meeker with his enormous errors in the past few races, all entirely self-inflicted. It happens, and nothing against them, but I have to smile all the same. Lorenzo has been getting an absolute beating from all corners of the world, on the internet and in print (heck, I've said a few things), and when he finally gets what he's been asking for, he wins two on the trot on pure pace alone. I must say I never thought he should retire and knew unlocking the Ducati would be difficult, but people have been outrageous suggesting he's past it, out of shape, has no motivation. All of this, utter bollocks. On balance, it seems that fault lies more with Ducati than Lorenzo if the stories out there are to be believed.

All that said, we all should be elated---and if Lorenzo can keep the pressure on, ride fast and error-free, we are in for a treat with several races left to go. The last two races suggest exactly that. Additionally, there are tracks that will not favor the Ducati as much, or Lorenzo, who loves both Mugello and Catalunya, so he will certainly be put to the test in Assen and places like the Sachsenring---however, on several more flowing and faster circuits such as Brno, Phillip Island, Aragon and Malaysia, Lorenzo and Ducati on paper should be strong. Very intriguing.

If Lorenzo keeps winning, and Marquez gets the red mist that he so often cannot say no to, we have something quite interesting on our hands. Especially if Dovi and Vinales can get it together. I think Vinales is going through something similar to Lorenzo, Yamaha needs to come up with a fix for him. He doesn't lack speed, fitness, motivation. Dare I say Rossi has led development away from what he prefers?

Lorenzo is back but let's not lose sight of the fact that the last 2 tracks were very much Ducati tracks plus the tyres also very much suited the Ducati and in particular Lorenzo these being too soft for the other bikes on high deg tracks, in Mugello even the hard tyre was to soft for the Honda, in Catalunya Rossi was complaining about the tyres, the problem it seems is that it was 12 degrees hotter than when the teams tested at the track and the tyres were then chosen, everything has advantaged Ducati these past 2 races.

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2017: 9th Place
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2018 9:59 am 
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Cold Gin wrote:
https://www.autosport.com/motogp/news/136368/lorenzo-approach-EUR~doesnt-work-at-ducati

Not even a month ago. Funny, that a piece of plastic was all that was needed for Lorenzo's "Approach" to work.

Lorenzo was right to leave, although personally I would have loved it if he would have stayed. Dovi better be careful. He might just get his posterior handed to him by the guy that just a few weeks ago, he was looking down on. The Spartan has risen! :) :) :)


Oh, I am quite sure that if Ducati acts in a balanced manner Lorenzo will be ahead of Dovi at the end of the year...


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2018 11:26 am 
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Cold Gin wrote:
Funny, that a piece of plastic was all that was needed for Lorenzo's "Approach" to work.
Blame it on spring fever on my part for being slow today, but would you please explain the piece of plastic? Does this refer to the tank adaptation?

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:04 pm 
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Yes, Fiki.

Essentially a spacer placed on the edge of the tank that supported his position on the bike with less stress to his arms and his core muscles, which was making him tired very fast on the previous iteration. As an aside, just looking at Lorenzo compared to his Yamaha days, he looks like he has put on weight with significantly more upper body muscularity.

There are pictures online I'm sure you can find of the difference regarding the revised tank, I saw some online a few days ago.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2018 5:36 pm 
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Good article from Matt Oxley below.

https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opin ... zo-winning

Why Lorenzo is winning
by Mat Oxley on 19th June 2018

The vital importance of straight-line braking in MotoGP’s Michelin era explained and the big question: can Lorenzo win the title for Ducati?




Over the years there have been many weird and wonderful world championships, but this year’s may be the weirdest and most wonderful of all.

There’s a three-time MotoGP world champion struggling to find his way with a recalcitrant motorcycle. His lack of results cause him to fall out with the factory management, so he looks elsewhere for employment, but none of the other factories want him. There are rumours of retirement and talk of a ride with an independent team, which doesn’t even exist. But this seems his only option.

Then he stuns us all by signing for the strongest team in the paddock at the very moment a vital new part arrives to transform his recalcitrant motorcycle into a winning machine. Then he goes and wins the next two races, comfortably outpacing the bike he will ride next year and his future team-mate, who was supposed to be unbeatable. I’ve been here 31 years and I can’t remember a stranger premier-class summer.

That’s what has happened over the past few weeks, but why has Jorge Lorenzo gone from perennial struggler on Ducati’s Desmosedici to the fastest man in MotoGP? Of course, we know about the plastic fuel tank hump that allows him to perform better during straight-line braking, but why exactly has this simple new part made such a difference?

As always, it’s all about the tyres. The Michelin front isn’t as good as the Michelin rear (it was the other way around with the Bridgestones), so riders can’t carry as much speed into corners and they can’t use the front tyre to scrub off speed during the entry phase. Hence all the fuss about straight-line braking, which has long been one of the Ducati’s strongest points, first for Andrea Dovizioso and now for Lorenzo.

Let Aprilia rider Aleix Espargaró explain. “Michelin has done a great job because we beat the lap record wherever we go,” says the Spaniard.

“The front tyre has improved a lot, so it’s very close to the Bridgestone front, but it’s still not the same. I remember with the Bridgestone front, having 15 bars of [front brake] pressure with 60 degrees of lean, elbow on the ground, locking the front and not crashing. This is impossible with the Michelin.

“With the Michelin the time between when you start braking and when you release the front brake has to be the very minimum. Dovizioso was the best at this. Whenever I’m with Dovizioso he never brakes later than me. We start braking at the same place but when he releases the front brake he’s 5kmh [3mph] slower than me, so in the same few metres he has lost more speed than me, so when we start leaning into the corner I’m risking 75 per cent while he’s risking 65 per cent. It’s all about stopping the bike in a straight line as fast as possible.”

Lorenzo had already got the hang of this brick-wall, straight-line braking technique, as he proved at Jerez, where Dovizioso was unable to make a clean pass on him. But he could not sustain the technique, because he couldn’t handle the g-forces over race distance.

And yet I can still hear you asking: but surely, why would a hundred Euro lump of plastic transform Lorenzo from top-10 struggler to dominator? Because the difference between winning and losing is tiny in modern MotoGP.
If this sounds a bit pathetic, consider this: when a mortal gets to use carbon brakes it’s easy to get caught out by their vicious stopping power. This has happened to me a couple of times, once while testing Mick Doohan’s Honda NSR500 at Catalunya sometime in the 1990s. When I braked for Turn 9 I experienced the weird kind of weightlessness that astronauts feel in space: my backside lifted off the seat and my whole body was thrown over the front of the bike, so I was looking at Doohan’s number-one plate, upside down. I was all set for the biggest crash of my life, but somehow I was still holding the handlebars and when I let go of the front brake, the g-force disappeared and I landed back on the seat.I learned from that bowel-loosening moment that whenever you hit the brakes with carbons brakes (carbon-carbons, to name them correctly) you must dig the soles of your boots deep into the footpegs and grip the tank with your thighs like you’re riding a bucking bronco, simply to resist the g-forces trying to hurl you forward. That was probably 20 years ago, so you can imagine the power of today’s MotoGP brakes.

According to Brembo data, there are nine braking points at Catalunya, including two zones of ultra-heavy straight-line braking, into Turns 1 and 10, were riders reduce their speed by about 120mph. At Turn 1 they go from 214mph to 62mph in 285 metres! Lorenzo’s winning advantage was gained via a few hundredths of a second during each braking zone; hardly a blink of the eye, but after 24 laps the improvements added up to a 4.5sec victory over Marc Márquez, who risked everything to stay with him.

In fact it’s not only Lorenzo’s braking that’s been improved by his ability to brace himself better during braking, because when you brake better in a straight line, you enter the corner better, turn the bike better and prepare the corner exit better, so you are faster and safer throughout the corner. Which gives you extra confidence which encourages you to push a deeper, try harder.

This is where Lorenzo is right now: he has transformed his downward vicious circle and into an upward virtuous circle.

Meanwhile, Honda’s RC213V, which was conceived to get the maximum out of Bridgestone’s front during corner entry, may have a problem, now that Lorenzo has upped the ante. While Lorenzo raced to victory on Sunday with a soft/soft combination, Márquez went with a hard front, while fellow RC213V rider chose the medium, after a few scares with the hard during practice.

“As soon as we touch the brake we are locking the front at 345kph (214mph),” said Crutchlow on Saturday afternoon. “It’s a scary, scary thing, so we need to play with the lever all the way into the corner. The Honda is amazing in braking, so we have to take advantage of that, but we have to use either of the harder front options and even then we sometimes crash because we brake so hard that we overheat the front and it doesn’t hold out.”

Of course, riding technique is only part of this conundrum; bike set-up is also vital. Espargaró again…

“Last year, at tracks like Austria and Austin we locked the front during straight braking if we didn’t have a good front-end set-up to help the front tyre. Sometimes it’s difficult to understand whether you aren’t putting enough weight on the tyre or whether you are collapsing the tyre, because the result can feel the same. Sometimes I tell my engineers that we are collapsing the front tyre on the brakes because the bike is moving so much. But after a lot of analysis we realise that we aren’t putting enough pressure on the tyre to help it grip, so it’s not easy to understand!”

Neither is it easy to predict Lorenzo’s chances of continuing his recent form and challenging for the 2018 world championship. He is currently 49 points behind Márquez, having taken 30 points out of the championship leader in the last two races, with a maximum of 300 points up for grabs at the remaining 12 races.

MotoGP now goes to Assen, where Lorenzo has only won once, way back in 2010, and he will surely struggle to match Márquez’s anti-clockwise genius at the Sachsenring, but he goes well at Brno, and the Red Bull Ring is basically a Ducati drag strip.

It’s impossible to even begin to guess the final championship outcome but there is no doubt that Lorenzo does have a title chance, however small it might seem right now.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 5:45 pm 
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Assen preview. To the Cathedral!

http://www.mcnews.com.au/2018-motogp-assen-pre1/

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 6:21 pm 
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Between F1 and MotoGP for whom are these statements most true?:

1. I consistently produce an entertaining race weekend - MotoGP
2. I provide an adequate avenue for the best riders/drivers in the world to eventually make it into this competition - MotoGP (close call as I think both sport struggle with this)
3. I have a competition in which the riders/drivers are just as important as the machinery - MotoGP
4. I engage the fans through many different media outlets and am easily accessible to anyone who is interested - F1 (close call but Dorna is a little too greedy for me)
5. My races are compelling and the riders/drivers have the ability to aggressively battle and overtake - MotoGP (by a mile)
6. Race wins and championships are often decided in a dramatic and/or interesting way - MotoGP
7. The riders/drivers and other people in the sport are interesting and engage the fans and media in ways that give people something to talk about - F1 (close call but F1 is doing really well with this nowadays)
8. The level of competition is as high or higher today than it has ever been in our sport - Both


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