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PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 9:25 pm 
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Saw the debate in the Mercedes and Ferrari thread and it got me thinking, which drivers do you think are the best on the tires and which ones would you consider the worst?

I have a few names in mind but I want to see what everyone else thinks before I add my opinion.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:09 am 
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Perez is the one who really stands out. Even going back to his Sauber days.

I've always felt Grosjean and Massa struggle to get the most out of the tyres.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 1:33 am 
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Yeah, I feel as if Perez is in a league of his own when it comes to tire wear. He's a super consistent driver, and not just with his tires. A very underrated driver in my view.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:26 pm 
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I've read comments in many places stating that some of the podiums earned by Perez were just down to good luck. It's his ability to be smooth with tyres & help strengthen his pit strategy o become more flexible.

I don't think the new tyres of 2017 are any boon to Perez's ability but prior to this year, his ability really made him stand out from the field.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 4:28 pm 
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I have to ask though guys, is there any connection between this and not being able to get the tyres up to operating temp?

I do not specificity mean the driver here, but if Driver A is thought very kind on tyres in car A, if he shifted to car B, which is known for not being able to get heat in soon, is he still going to be the same? or will his style mean he has to work the tyres even harder than his team mate to get the performance, and is then seen as tough on his tyres?

Is it just that a combination of Driver A, Car A and tyre A all fall in a nice line while Driver B in car a with tyre A would not, but would in car B with tyre B? By tyre, I dont mean grade but manufacturer.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 4:32 pm 
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moby wrote:
I have to ask though guys, is there any connection between this and not being able to get the tyres up to operating temp?

I do not specificity mean the driver here, but if Driver A is thought very kind on tyres in car A, if he shifted to car B, which is known for not being able to get heat in soon, is he still going to be the same? or will his style mean he has to work the tyres even harder than his team mate to get the performance, and is then seen as tough on his tyres?

Is it just that a combination of Driver A, Car A and tyre A all fall in a nice line while Driver B in car a with tyre A would not, but would in car B with tyre B? By tyre, I dont mean grade but manufacturer.

It's an interesting point. Drivers may look good or bad from one season to another without actually changing their driving much themselves


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 5:09 pm 
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Besides Perez, maybe we should talk of others too?


1. Vettel - By all accounts from his Red Bull time, he was good at making tyres last, and exceptionally good at understanding tyre characteristics.
2. Raikkonen - Seems to be generally on the smoother side, but conversely has issues with warm-up too.
3. Button - Was known to be smooth, making them last long. Was also great at knowing the exact time to switch to wets/intermediates.
4. Alonso - His driving style was always known to be hard on the fronts, and I think he is right in the middle of making his tyres last, neither the shortest, nor the longest. He did, however, seemed to be the best at extracting performance from very unpredictable tyres, as shown by 2012, and the first half of 2013, till Pirelli made the tyres more durable.
5. Schumacher - Always seemed to be on the harder side on tyres, and I don't think tyre study was ever his forte. Maybe because for a lot of time Bridgestone was dedicated to Ferrari, doing a lot of work for them. It could be why he struggled so much with Pirelli, only getting up to speed with them after more than 2 years, in 2012.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 7:21 pm 
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I don't really know who are the stand outs. Most drivers have had several races where they have managed to look after their tyres and get a good result. I think last year, Ericsson may have broken a record for the most laps during a race on one set of tyres. He did 69 and he managed P11 in a Sauber with only a Manor retiring that race. Although the tyre wear was minimal that race, to get that sort of result in such a slow car must have meant he did a pretty solid job on those tyres. And in the last race. Ericsson did 62 laps on softs. That just shouldn't be possible but he seemed to manage it. But he did have to pit right near the end. I would possibly say both Sauber drivers have managed some impressive long stints this year. But I agree with others that Perez is particularly good at this.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 12:26 pm 
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Lewis hamilton doesnt get the credit he deserves when it comes to tyre preservation.
He has always had a stigma of being hard on his tyres. But alot of the time. These are debunked. Was it hungary 2013 in the Mercedes while securing his first win for them had to be gental on his tyres to enable them to last the distance required for each stint.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 1:11 pm 
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wire2004 wrote:
Lewis hamilton doesnt get the credit he deserves when it comes to tyre preservation.
He has always had a stigma of being hard on his tyres. But alot of the time. These are debunked. Was it hungary 2013 in the Mercedes while securing his first win for them had to be gental on his tyres to enable them to last the distance required for each stint.

There was also that race in Spain where he got a grid penalty and had to start at the back of the grid, 14 places behind Button, yet finished ahead of Button because he could make the tyres last much longer.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 2:59 pm 
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Alienturnedhuman wrote:
wire2004 wrote:
Lewis hamilton doesnt get the credit he deserves when it comes to tyre preservation.
He has always had a stigma of being hard on his tyres. But alot of the time. These are debunked. Was it hungary 2013 in the Mercedes while securing his first win for them had to be gental on his tyres to enable them to last the distance required for each stint.

There was also that race in Spain where he got a grid penalty and had to start at the back of the grid, 14 places behind Button, yet finished ahead of Button because he could make the tyres last much longer.


Also Monaco last year was impressive with his long stint on the Wets I think it was.

The top guys wouldn't be the top guys if they weren't the best on the tyres but I'd put Perez with them as well as a nod to Wehrlein who has a habit of going very aggressive on tyre strategy and usually does very well in making them last.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 3:07 am 
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Daniel Ricciardo should get a mention here.

Many of his 2014 performances came about because he displayed an excellent ability to save his tyres for a late race assault (to great effect).

This year at Monaco he did much the same thing, looking after his tyres until Verstappen & Raikkonen pitted then laying down a series of fastest laps to leapfrog them.

The RB13 has seemed to mask his abilities in this area so far this year, but 2014 stands out.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:27 am 
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UnlikeUday wrote:
I've read comments in many places stating that some of the podiums earned by Perez were just down to good luck. It's his ability to be smooth with tyres & help strengthen his pit strategy o become more flexible.

I don't think the new tyres of 2017 are any boon to Perez's ability but prior to this year, his ability really made him stand out from the field.


Doesn't this just underline the point that when we say 'X' driver is the best, a lot of it depends on how the rules are framed in that moment and how that plays against his various strength and weaknesses.

Also see Kimi.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:38 am 
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oz_karter wrote:
Daniel Ricciardo should get a mention here.

Many of his 2014 performances came about because he displayed an excellent ability to save his tyres for a late race assault (to great effect).

This year at Monaco he did much the same thing, looking after his tyres until Verstappen & Raikkonen pitted then laying down a series of fastest laps to leapfrog them.

The RB13 has seemed to mask his abilities in this area so far this year, but 2014 stands out.


I was about to come in here and mention Dan. His debut win in Canada is proof of his tyre preservation skill.

I also tried to make this point in that Max vs Dan thread a while back.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 11:19 am 
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TheGiantHogweed wrote:
I don't really know who are the stand outs. Most drivers have had several races where they have managed to look after their tyres and get a good result. I think last year, Ericsson may have broken a record for the most laps during a race on one set of tyres. He did 69 and he managed P11 in a Sauber with only a Manor retiring that race. Although the tyre wear was minimal that race, to get that sort of result in such a slow car must have meant he did a pretty solid job on those tyres. And in the last race. Ericsson did 62 laps on softs. That just shouldn't be possible but he seemed to manage it. But he did have to pit right near the end. I would possibly say both Sauber drivers have managed some impressive long stints this year. But I agree with others that Perez is particularly good at this.
I recall Vettel pitting on the final lap at Monza (was it 2010?) simply to meet the criteria of using two sets of tyres, if my memory serves me correctly.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:47 pm 
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tootsie323 wrote:
TheGiantHogweed wrote:
I don't really know who are the stand outs. Most drivers have had several races where they have managed to look after their tyres and get a good result. I think last year, Ericsson may have broken a record for the most laps during a race on one set of tyres. He did 69 and he managed P11 in a Sauber with only a Manor retiring that race. Although the tyre wear was minimal that race, to get that sort of result in such a slow car must have meant he did a pretty solid job on those tyres. And in the last race. Ericsson did 62 laps on softs. That just shouldn't be possible but he seemed to manage it. But he did have to pit right near the end. I would possibly say both Sauber drivers have managed some impressive long stints this year. But I agree with others that Perez is particularly good at this.
I recall Vettel pitting on the final lap at Monza (was it 2010?) simply to meet the criteria of using two sets of tyres, if my memory serves me correctly.


Rosberg did an entire race on Pirellis after flat spotted them into turn 1 - Russia 2014 and still managed 2nd place.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:40 am 
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Can I throw a cat among the pidgins by asking if a driver who makes his tyres last, and is not leading the race, is working (them) hard enough?


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:46 am 
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moby wrote:
Can I throw a cat among the pidgins by asking if a driver who makes his tyres last, and is not leading the race, is working (them) hard enough?


That would depend how much life they had in them at the end. Unless they literally fall off on the victory lap it's hard for us to know.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:59 am 
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lamo wrote:
tootsie323 wrote:
TheGiantHogweed wrote:
I don't really know who are the stand outs. Most drivers have had several races where they have managed to look after their tyres and get a good result. I think last year, Ericsson may have broken a record for the most laps during a race on one set of tyres. He did 69 and he managed P11 in a Sauber with only a Manor retiring that race. Although the tyre wear was minimal that race, to get that sort of result in such a slow car must have meant he did a pretty solid job on those tyres. And in the last race. Ericsson did 62 laps on softs. That just shouldn't be possible but he seemed to manage it. But he did have to pit right near the end. I would possibly say both Sauber drivers have managed some impressive long stints this year. But I agree with others that Perez is particularly good at this.
I recall Vettel pitting on the final lap at Monza (was it 2010?) simply to meet the criteria of using two sets of tyres, if my memory serves me correctly.


Rosberg did an entire race on Pirellis after flat spotted them into turn 1 - Russia 2014 and still managed 2nd place.
I don't quite know what you mean by an entire race after flat spotting his tyres. He pitted after this and did 51 laps so not quite the "entire" race.

Several drivers have done most of the race on one set then. My main point is that a couple of times recently, Ericsson has done close to 70 laps on one set. 69 in Mexico last year and 62 on soft the previous race in Hungary. Although this one didn't work out well. I still think it may be true that Ericsson holds the record for the most amount of laps on one set on tyres in a race unless anyone has done over 69 in Hungary, Canada, Monaco or Mexico. Are there any other races that have over this number of laps?


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:02 pm 
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mikeyg123 wrote:
moby wrote:
Can I throw a cat among the pidgins by asking if a driver who makes his tyres last, and is not leading the race, is working (them) hard enough?


That would depend how much life they had in them at the end. Unless they literally fall off on the victory lap it's hard for us to know.


What I mean is a driver doing XXX laps on tyres is not really relevant. If they did XXX laps and finished in front of a teammate who had a clean run, then it is.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:29 pm 
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Zoue wrote:
moby wrote:
I have to ask though guys, is there any connection between this and not being able to get the tyres up to operating temp?

I do not specificity mean the driver here, but if Driver A is thought very kind on tyres in car A, if he shifted to car B, which is known for not being able to get heat in soon, is he still going to be the same? or will his style mean he has to work the tyres even harder than his team mate to get the performance, and is then seen as tough on his tyres?

Is it just that a combination of Driver A, Car A and tyre A all fall in a nice line while Driver B in car a with tyre A would not, but would in car B with tyre B? By tyre, I dont mean grade but manufacturer.

It's an interesting point. Drivers may look good or bad from one season to another without actually changing their driving much themselves



agree with these. you have to be in the right temp window. either side and even say a gentle style will get higher wear then someone who is more aggressive but has the right temps.

it seems if your 'natural' driving style aligns with the correct tyre temp then you have an advantage. some drivers can adapt better then others. alonso has always been aggressive but can make them last. kimi was good with michelins and the tyres in 2012 and 13 but since they have made them harder for the hybrids he doesnt seem to have had any advantage in tyre life in general. button is smooth like kimi but i think he was better at adapting to generate heat, especially in mixed conditions.


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